Hainaut (Coats of Arms of the County)

by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg

Rarity in the city atlas

Detail

Date of first edition: 1588

Date of this map: 1588

Dimensions (not including margins): 33,5 x 41,2 cm

Condition: Excellent. Old colour. Strong print and clear image.

Condition rating: A+

Map reference: Taschen, Br. Hog., P. 7226

From: Civitates Orbis Terrarum, Urbium praecipuarum totius mundi, liber quartus, first edition 1588.

 

Item number:
27002
Region:
Europe
Benelux
Belgium country
Curiosities
Categories:
Recent Additions
Price (without VAT): 750,00 (FYI +/- $847,50 / £675,00)
We charge the following expedition costs in euro: 
– Benelux: 20 euro
– Rest of Europe: 30 euro
– Rest of the World: 50 euro

In stock

Hainaut: a rare table of arms

This table of arms (Nobilis Hannoniae) is a rather strange insertion in the city atlas of Braun and Hogenberg. Moreover, very few of these tables even exist. The cities of this county are illustrated as towers (with their shields incorporated) guarding the wooden wall. Smaller locations are shown inside the oval circle. The double headed eagle (top) symbolizes the principality’s dependence on the Holy Roman Empire. Mons, its capital, dominates the bottom center. Many cities were lost to France, such as Vallencenes, Avesne, Maubeuge, Bavay, Beaumont and Quesnoli. Between 1051 and 1280 Hainaut was part of Flanders. From 1280 and until 1356 the local House of Avesne (top right) ruled this region. In that (last) year the House of Wittelsbach took over.

For the locals: Ath, Bince, Cimay and Enghien are familiar cities in this county. Moreover, Hal (Halle) had always been part of Hainaut, not of Brabant: see its tower middle left. On the other hand, Tournai (Doornik), situated on the “west” bank of the river Scheldt (Schelde), was historically part of the county of Flanders and not of Hainaut. Therefore, Tournai is not to been seen on this table of arms.

 

 

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