Portrait of Jan Hughen van Linschoten

by Jan Huygen van Linschoten

Detail

Date of first edition:  1596

Date of this map: 1596

Dimensions (not including margins): 17 x 23 cm

Condition: Very good. Strong paper.

Condition rating: A+

Verso: blanc

From: Itinerario

 

 

Item number:
55004
Region:
VOC-WIC
Portraits & Titlepages
Categories:
Recent Additions
Price (without VAT): 500,00 (FYI +/- $590,00 / £445,00)
We charge the following expedition costs in euro: 
– Benelux: 20 euro
– Rest of Europe: 30 euro
– Rest of the World: 50 euro

In stock

van Linschoten: to Goa and back

This small and unique view shows the head and chest of the 32-year-old Jan Huygen van Linschoten. He wrote part of his life in Itinerario, Voyage ofte schipvaert van Jan Huyghen van Linschoten naer Oost ofte Portugaels Indien (1579-1592 (published in 1596).

Van Linschoten left the Netherlands for Spain in 1576 to be with his brother in Seville, remaining in Spain until 1580 when he got a job working with another merchant in Lisbon. He served as the Portuguese Viceroy’s secretary in Goa between 1583 and 1588, where he copied some top-secret charts, including nautical data like currents, deeps, islands and sandbanks. Upon the death of the Archbishop of Goa, Linschoten returned to Lisbon in 1589. En route, he encountered English pirates, which forced a shipwreck, forcing Linschoten to the Azores, where he remained for 2 years. In June 1594, Linschoten sailed from Texel in the expedition headed by Dutch cartographer Willem Barentsz.

The Itinerario provides extensive information about the Indian itinerary and Portuguese colonies, at a time when the trading empire was challenged by the English and Dutch. It contains some beautiful maps. This work contains a large number of sailing directions, not only for shipping between Portugal and the East Indies colonies, but also between India, China and Japan.

This portrait was the frontispiece of the travel book. Van Linschoten is surrounded by vignettes of Goa, Mozambique and two views of St. Helena. His motto is placed at the top: souffrir pour parvenir (one has to suffer in order to succeed). In 1592 he settled in Enkhuizen, where he would die too.

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