The Hague – Hagae Comitis

by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg, Johannes Janssonius

With weapons of the city and the county of Holland

Detail

Date of first edition: Braun & Hogenberg

Date of this edition: 1657 (Janssonius)

Dimensions (not including margins): 39 x 49 cm

Condition: Very good. Nice colouring. No opinion on the map outside the frame (bought as such)

Condition rating: A

Verso: text in Latin

From: Theatrum Praecipuarum Urbium, Amsterdam, 1657.

Item number:
32003
Region:
Europe
Benelux
Netherlands cities
Categories:
Recent Additions
Price (without VAT): 1 300,00 (FYI +/- $1 534,00 / £1 170,00)
We charge the following expedition costs in euro: 
– Benelux: 20 euro
– Rest of Europe: 30 euro
– Rest of the World: 50 euro

In stock

Braun and Hogenberg show The Hague: a nice city to visit

The bird’s-eye view plan from the southwest by Braun-Hogenberg was originally published in the sixth and last volume of their city atlas in 1628. The absence of any city walls strikes: grown by the Late Middle Ages to the size of a city, The Hague never received city rights. Standing out clearly is the late Gothic Sint-Jacobskerk. On its immediate right is the Renaissance town hall. The (open) Buitenhof and the Binnenhof with the Hofvijver are the prime interest of this plan. Note that just a few km west (top of the map), the North Sea is situated. Today, the Peace Palace houses the International Court of Justice. The Peace Palace was built in 1907. Its purpose was to settle international disputes. And thus, it also housed the Permanent Court of International Justice (1922–1946) under the League of Nations [and its successor the International Court of Justice (1946–present)]. This court settles disputes between (mainly) nations and is not to be confused with the International Criminal Court, which deals with criminal matters on an individual level (such as genocide) and is also based in The Hague.

The International Court of Justice

 

 

 

 

Related items